creativity

You are currently browsing articles tagged creativity.

Abstract

Most people consider Italian creativity to be art, sculpture, music and literature.  While these are valid, they exclude the creativity of everyday, industry, innovation, science, and education.  This analysis will utilize a humanistic psychology perspective that investigates creativity of the everyday through industrial and business innovation, urban life, science, and education.  This analysis will also include the perspective and observations of the author based upon his visits and experiences with family in southern Italy.

 

Introduction

To me, Italian creativity has always meant art, sculpture, music (classical and popular), science, philosophy, and literature because these are the forms I always sought out to learn from my father’s and grandmother’s culture.  Personally, creativity always meant creativity in the everyday:  in thinking, writing, procreation, business, industry, dreams, and yes, fine art.  Cropley (2011) gives us an overview of definitions of creativity that includes traditional fine arts.  However, he also points out creativity that is now “widely defined as the production of relevant and effective novelty” with a specific purpose applicable to business engineering that is different from the effectiveness of artistic creativity.

Creativity in Italy has been discussed for centuries, beginning as far back as Thomas Aquinas’ (1221-1274).  However, creativity as a term was not introduced until the 19th century, and its psychological analysis and assessment did not occur until the 1960s and 1970s when English-language psychology texts on creativity were transliterated into Italian (Antonietti & Cornoldi, 2006).  According to the authors, creativity focused primarily on three issues:  Reflection on the theoretical frameworks relevant to the creative process and the experiments based on those frameworks, the measurement of creative abilities, and the application of methods promoting that creativity.  In Italy, the application of those methods has been criticized for being unfocused utilizing general approaches to stimulating creativity.  As a result, another method (Programma di Sviluppo della Creativita` Infantile or PSCI: Children’s Creativity Enhancement Training) is explored to stimulate critical thinking in the students four to ten years of age towards creative solutions to solving problems in an imaginative way (Cerioli & Antonietti, 1992b in Antonietti & Cornoldi, 2006).  It is this point that we will mostly concern ourselves with in this paper as we explore creativity in economics and policy, education, urban life, and industry.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

For a long time, I’ve had my own hypotheses regarding creativity, writing, and imagination, and Pritzker (2011) discusses some of them.  What’s immediately intriguing in the citation of large-scale biographical studies is that the writers that were analyzed were likely to be voracious readers and came from homes as very unhappy. This explains a lot about my childhood environment as well as my voracious reading habits that continue today and my graphic imagination and need for escape.  However, there is one statistic that probably needs more research; given the low numbers, the element of an alcoholic parent(s) or a parent(s) afflicted by depression of one form or another.  I am hesitant to agree with the statistics here without digging into the original research more deeply because I have read similar accounts that those who are either alcoholics or depressed or afflicted in some way make better creatives.  While I have been inclined to believe that idea in the past, due to my creative nature and my minor non-clinical depression, the idea of it is so much glamorizing and romanticizing an affliction.  Elsewhere, the author suggests that the correlation may be correlational but does little to dispel what seems to read like a series of urban myths.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , ,

Creativity is part of human life and it may be a part of existence on earth whether it is human or not, but that is a conversation and a debate for a later day.  Human beings, and this is my view, have an innate and vital need to create, whether it is procreation or some other form of artistic creativity, it is a need that is basic to all of us.  In this, I obviously differ from Cropley (2011) who views definitions of creativity that include everything that I would, except the sex act and procreation (though for some that can be terribly pedestrian).  Cropley understand the creative process, however, and includes everything from problem-solving to art.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , ,

I propose, as I have in many of my academic writings and conversations that within all of us is a vital need to create, even within the most anti-creative of us. My father may be a perfect example of this when he eschews all creative activity because it distracts from “more important things” in life, like making money, making babies and raising a family, and a myriad of other activities that he does not view as creative, viewed through the lens of his Italian family culture. Yet, my father can take a broken down bicycle and lawnmower and make them sing. And he sculpts, but not in a traditional “artistic” sense. He can take a piece of animal flesh and carve it into shapes that no other meat cutter I have ever met can do. I call my father the anti-creative artist. And then there is me with the need to write, a need for music and making music mixes, and a need to draw that out of others. Perspective is everything for all of us.

Krippner (2011) explore creativity from a waking consciousness and a variety of alternative states, primarily the latter, but it is more of an overview. While important and valuable, overviews of such complex topics don’t include everything and they always compel me to dig deeper into the sources that are referenced. This is no different. However, I did find it intriguing, but not surprising that early researchers equated schizophrenic psychotic states with altered consciousness states stimulated by a variety of natural and manufactured drugs. Interestingly, I have read recent accounts in a few journals where researchers are experimenting with LSD to help minimize psychotic states in schizophrenics.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , ,